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GAMBIA-L  March 2007, Week 1

GAMBIA-L March 2007, Week 1

Subject:

Fwd: Foroyaa Newspaper Burning Issue No. 026/2007, 5-6 March, 2007

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Foroyaa Newspaper Burning Issue
Issue No. 026/2007, 5-6 March,  2007

Editorial
DOES THE PRESIDENT HAVE THE CONSTITUTIONAL MANDATE TO OPEN  PARLIAMENT?
No Is The Answer!!
In a country which is a constitutional  monarchy, sovereignty resides in the 
monarch. Hence the provision of services  are deemed to be done under the 
jurisdiction of the monarch. In such countries  you may have state opening of 
parliament. The king or queen would come to  parliament and address the members 
and then declare the session open.
The  Gambia is however a Republic. There is separation of powers between the  
executive, legislature and judiciary. Parliament opens when the members elect 
a  speaker and deputy speaker and are sworn in. 
After the first sitting which  marks the election of speaker and deputy 
speaker subsequent sittings like the  one held on Friday shall be “at such times as 
the National Assembly shall  appoint.” Emergency meetings may be requested 
for by the president or by ¼ of  the members. There is no provision for a state 
opening of parliament. 
What  exists in the constitution is what exists in all Republics, that is, “
the state  of the Nation address.”
In short, the executive in a Republic is required to  report to parliament at 
least once a year on the policies of government for  debate. In this way, 
parliament can have an input in shaping government  policy.
This is stipulated clearly under Section 77 (1) of the Gambia  Constitution. 
It reads “The President shall at least once in each year attend a  sitting of 
the National Assembly and address a session on the condition of the  Gambia, 
the policies of the government and the administration of the  state.”
This should be a period for contemplation for all National Assembly  members 
in particular and the Nation at large.
The farmers should be  wondering what policies government intends to put in 
place to purchase the  groundnuts. The unemployed should be waiting to find out 
what the government  intends to do to ensure that they have employment. The 
families with members who  are detained without trial would want to know what 
the government policy is with  regards to their release. Those who are 
imprisoned for long years would want to  know whether the president would exercise his 
prerogative of mercy. The students  at the Gambia College would want to know 
whether they will be housed in the  campus or are going to reside in town at a 
cost that will undermine the ability  of the poor students to continue their 
education as teachers.
Those who  travel would want to know government policy on migration. We can 
go on and  on.
What is rather strange is that the whole coming of the president to the  
parliament was transformed into an APRC party activity with young people  
mobilized from everywhere to accompany the President to parliament. One wonders  what 
would have happened if the opposition also invited their supporters and  
drummers to accompany them to the National Assembly as a show of support. What  is 
also evident is the transformation of the seat of the Speaker into the green  
colour of the APRC. One would wonder what would happen if each member of the  
opposition were to paint their seats into their party colours.
Those in the  majority in the National Assembly should be sensitive to the 
concerns of the  minority instead of imposing their will on them.
The Executive and the  legislature which derive authority from consent should 
be mindful of creating  standards of best practice which will be of benefit 
to them in particular and  the society in general when they no longer find 
themselves in the  majority.
Those who are empowered to decide for the whole Nation should not  be 
partisan in thinking and action. They should do what the whole nation would  
appreciate irrespective of party affiliation. The transformation of the grounds  of 
the National assembly into a party atmosphere is a wrong start for a  
legislature which is supposed to be separate from the Executive and charged with  the 
responsibility of scrutinizing the Executive without fear or favour,  affection 
or ill will. The standing ovation and clapping by National assembly  members 
themselves either confirms that they do not know what is written in the  
Standing Orders or that they prefer not to show any respect for their  rules.
This behaviour should not continue if the National Assembly is to earn  the 
respect it should have.
Foroyaa hopes that those concerns will be taken  into consideration by the 
Executive and the legislature. History will be written  someday. Let justice 
guide our actions.

PRESIDENT JAMMEH ADDRESSES  PARLIAMENT
On Friday 2nd March 2007 President Jammeh addressed parliament  comprising 5 
representatives on the side of the minority, 1 independent  candidate, 4 
nominated members and 42 on the side of the majority. Under the  Constitution the 
President is empowered to appoint 5 nominated members two of  whom become 
Speaker and Deputy Speaker respectively. 
Judging by the  behaviour of the nominated members it appears that all of 
them belong to the  party of the president or organisations allied to it. The 
President explained  the policies of the government with regards to agriculture, 
education, health,  environment, economic affairs, fisheries, tourism, 
petroleum exploration,  foreign policy, migration and ended by cautioning the 
National assembly members  to desist from promising the people everything only to 
hide from them after  being elected. Foroyaa could not get a copy of the speech 
after the address. It  was claimed that the President had added certain remarks 
which were not  incorporated in the speech and that efforts will be made to 
incorporate them.  Foroyaa will report on each policy item indicated by the 
president and then  weigh it against the available facts to give the reader a 
comprehensive view of  the President’s speech and its review by Foroyaa.
Let us look at the issue of  electricity supply for 24 hours. According to 
the President they now have the  capacity to provide 24 hours electricity supply 
in the urban area but that the  archaic transmission lines pose as the 
problem.
When Foroyaa publishes the  position of the President it will also refer to 
loan agreements with the  Import/Export Bank of Taiwan which gave a loan of 
approximately 500 million  dalasis to rehabilitate the transmission lines a long 
time ago. We will ask for  a report of progress in the utilization of the loan 
to rehabilitate the  transmission line.

KASSA JAATA & CO. TRIAL
ASP SAWANEH TESTIFIES IN COURT
By  Fabakary B. Ceesay
Assistant Superintendent of Police Sawaneh, who was the  Station Officer at 
Bakau Police Station, has testified in the criminal case of  Dudu Kassa Jaata  
and seven (7) others at the Kanifing Magistrates’ Court  presided over by 
Magistrate Abdoulie Mbackeh
ASP Sawaneh told the court that  on the 27th June 2006, he received a 
complaint from one Fatou Badjie and some  APRC agents who were conducting a voter 
registration exercise at Bakau  Bantankoto. According to him, they complained 
that Ousman Jatta insulted and  abused them at the registration centre. He said 
that based on that complaint,  Ousman Jatta was invited to the police station 
and he came; that Mr. Jatta was  confronted with the complaint and was 
cautioned, charged and detained. ASP  Sawaneh told the court that Dudou Kassa, later 
led a group of people who came to  the police station and obstructed the police 
from doing their duties. He said  that while in the process of transferring 
Ousman Jatta to Banjul Police Station  they were being obstructed by Kassa and 
team; that he could recognise one Lamin  Jatta and Kassa among those who 
surrounded the police vehicle to stop Ousman  Jatta being transferred to Banjul; 
that they were also shouting and insulting  but that the insults were open and 
not directed to anyone. He said that later,  he and his men had tried to arrest 
them, but in vain. ASP Sawaneh explained that  later that evening, one Sam 
Dubois, Sirreh Jammeh and her mother, Binta Njie  came to the station with an 
iron bar and lodged a complaint against certain  individuals; that Sam Dubois 
complained that one Cherno Ndure, Mariama Fatty,  Lamin Jassey and Mambarama 
Jatta came to his compound gate and were insulting  him and his family; that 
Sirreh Jammeh complained that while she was at the  registration centre, Cherno 
Ndure came with a group of people and that the said  Cherno attempted to hit  
her with an iron bar, but fortunately her(Sirreh)  mother Binta Njie held the 
iron bar.
ASP Sawaneh said that the complaints  were registered. The iron bar was 
marked as an exhibit; that they later pursued  the arrest of the accused persons 
but it was not possible. Going further with  his testimony, ASP Sawaneh told the 
court that on the 1st August, 2006 the  police chief of operations, Inspector 
Landing Bojang and his batch of men from  the Police Intervention Unit (PIU) 
came to Bakau Police Station to help them  arrest the accused persons; that it 
was around 9pm when officers led by  detective constable Abdoulie Manneh left 
for Jatta Kunda to effect the arrest of  one Mariama Fatty but instead a 
wrong person, by the name Nyima Manneh, was  arrested and taken to the station; 
that when it was realised that a wrong person  was arrested, they then 
apologised to the victim and then released her. He said  that later on, Dudu Kassa 
Jaata led a group of people to the station in a  violent manner and demanded that 
Nyima be released not knowing that she had  already been released. He said 
that the stones they were throwing damaged one  public telephone booth near the 
station. He also said that they wanted to arrest  Kassa but could not do so 
because of the crowd. The witness told the court that  it was around 9:55 pm when 
he led a team of officers including Abdoulie Manneh,  Corporal Cham and 
Manlafi Barry together with the PIU personnel to Jatta Kunda  to arrest Kassa, 
Mariama Fatty and others; that upon arrival they met a group of  people at the 
Jatta Kunda gate and among them was one Lamin Jawara. He said that  they were all 
shouting and saying, “no police or PIU will enter with arms in  their 
compound.” He said that Lamin Jawara then asked them to keep quiet so he  can speak 
on their behalf. “Lamin Jawara asked me what was our mission to their  
compound. I told him we were there to arrest Kassa, Mariama Fatty, Cherno Ndure  and 
others who we believed were living there. Lamin insisted that I can be  
permitted to enter but other officers will not be allowed. I insisted and told  him ‘
you cannot dictate what I am to do’ and I reminded him not to obstruct us,”  
Sawaneh narrated. Sawaneh said there was a large crowd in the compound, but 
that  himself, Cherno and Manneh  entered. He said that upon their entry and 
they  were insulted, humiliated and abused by those in the crowd. He said “some 
of the  insults and abusive languages were directed to the police.” He said 
that one  boy, whom he cannot identify, was pushing and pulling with him and 
Lamin Jawara  then intervened, held him (Sawaneh) by the hand and thus making the 
boy escape  from his grip. The witness told the court, that when Kassa later 
appeared, he  held him (Kassa) by the shirt with one hand and then informed him 
that he was  under arrest; that Lamin Jawara continued to obstruct him until 
Kassa also  escaped from him. Sawaneh said Lamin Jawara insisted then he 
arrested Lamin for  obstructing the arrests of Kassa and the other boy. He said 
that a sister,  Isatou Jawara, also insisted that she will go to the station 
alongside her  brother Lamin; that Isatou was warned that the Police have nothing 
to do with  her but she insisted and was also arrested; that the duo were 
escorted to the  station. He said that Omar Jatta was also handed over to them by 
the  Commissioner of Police, Jatta Baldeh for refusing to leave the Police 
station  premises. The trio, he said were handed over to the PIU at Kanifing for 
security  reasons. ASP Sawaneh concluded that Kassa, Cherno, Lamin Jasseh, 
Mamburama  Jatta, Lamin Jatta and Mariama Fatty reported themselves to the Bakau 
Police  Station and were arrested, cautioned and charged. Dudu Kassa Jaata and 
seven  others were charged for Public Violence and Obstructing Police 
officers while  executing their duties. The case was adjourned for further  hearing.

AT THE COURT MARTIAL 
Lt. SANYANG CROSS-EXAMINED
By  Fabakary B. Ceesay
During cross-examination of Lieutenant Pharing Sanyang by  the state counsel, 
Emmanuel O. Fagbenle, in the ongoing court martial at Yundum  Barracks on 
Thursday 1st March 2007, the accused told the court that he had  never lied until 
the day he made his statement. 
Responding to the question  as to where he stated the truth in his statement, 
Lt Sanyang said that it is his  name, age, address and signature. He said 
that the day he was assigned to the  airport his commander had confidence in him 
and that was why he was given the  assignment. He told the court that the 
reason why he was replaced by Lieutenant  Ceesay at the airport was because of the 
fact that he underwent an operation;  that the operation was a result of an 
accident in October 2003 during which he  sustained injuries. When asked which 
part of his body sustained injuries, he  replied that the areas affected were 
his right lower jaw and the right side of  his neck. “I’m putting it to you 
that you sustained injuries on your head, arms,  legs, chest and back as a 
result of that accident,” said Fagbenle. Lt Sanyang  replied, “the only place I 
sustained injuries from that accident is on my right  lower jaw and at my right 
side of the neck.” “I’m putting it to you that all the  scars that you have 
showed to this court were injuries that you sustained from  that accident in 
2003 and not from the beating as you claimed,” Fagbenle said.  Lt Sanyang said. 
“That is incorrect.” When asked whether his rifle was supposed  to be in the 
armoury, he responded that unless it was not allowed by the  commander, it 
must be kept in the arms store and not in the armoury. He was  asked whether at 
anytime he was in charge of the coup plotters, Sanyang replied  that that has 
never happened. “Are you in a position at the airport to do the  coup,” asked 
Fagbenle. Lt Sanyang replied, “the opportunity was there, but I was  not to 
do it because I was not part of it,” said Pharing. Asked about the amount  of 
soldiers with him at the airport, he said he was given about (30) thirty  
soldiers. He also said that he never had any quarrel with Malick Jatta prior to  
his arrest; that the size of the hammer he was hit with by Malick Jatta can be  
the size of the handle of a fan.  The state counsel asked Lt Sanyang how  many 
statements were shown to him before he made his statement on the 22nd March  
2006, he replied that he was shown a bunch of papers that were said to belong 
to  those who were first arrested like Captain Bunja Darboe and Captain Wassa  
Camara, Lt. Sanyang denied talking to Corporal Samba Bah on his way to the  
airport and that he was even surprised to know that he had talked to Corporal  
Bah. Lt Sanyang told the court-martial that he cannot tell whether the first  
accused (Bunja) and the third accused (Wassa) had made any statements before. 
He  said that when he went to the hospital to extract his broken tooth, he 
informed  the doctor that it was as a result of torture. Lt Sanyang added that 
the removed  piece of tooth was given to him but he forgot it on the doctor’s  
table.

DISCHARGED REPATRIATED MIGRANTS GRANTED BAIL
By Modou  Jonga
Three repatriated migrants have been released on police bail after  being 
arrested by the police upon their discharge by Magistrate E.F M’bai on  Tuesday 
27th February, reliable sources informed this paper.
The source  informed this reporter, that the three earlier discharged by the 
court and later  re-arrested by the police, were granted bail on the same day 
at the Brikama  Police Station.
Readers could recall, that the trio, Sanusi Suwareh, Yankuba  Manneh and 
Bakary Ngum are part of thirty repatriated Gambian Migrants standing  trial at the 
Brikama Magistrates’ Court. They were arraigned for alleged  malicious damage 
to the property of The Gambia Civil Aviation Authority, at the  Banjul 
International Airport on 28th October last year.
The three accused  persons discharged by Magistrate M’bai were the only three 
present in court at  the time of their discharge on 27th February. Their 
discharge came in the wake  of the inability of the Police to effect two separate 
bench warrants concerning  the accused that he issued on 12th December 2006 
and 12th February, 2007,  respectively.
It could also be recalled that after being discharged, the trio  were 
prevented from leaving the premises of the Brikama Magistrate’s court and  ordered to 
board a vehicle which then headed for the Brikama Police  Station.
It is reported that prior to their arraignment before the Brikama  Magistrates
’ Court the thirty accused persons were reporting to the Yundum  Police 
Station. The source also revealed that the 30 repatriated migrants from  Spain 
arraigned in court are less than those who arrived in the airport on the  day this 
alleged offence of malicious damage to properties of the GCAA was said  to 
have occurred.

MAGISTRATE ADVISES PROSECUTORS
By Modou  Jonga
Magistrate Edrissa Fafa M’bai of the Brikama Magistrates’ Court has  
expressed his view over prosecutors who at times in his court, fail to proceed  with 
cases and or to prove their cases beyond reasonable doubts.
Magistrate  M’bai made these remarks on Wednesday after the adjournment of a 
case assigned  to another prosecutor who transferred his case to his 
colleague. Magistrate  M’bai said that the said case was unable to proceed for quite a 
while now (for  more than two months).
Magistrate M’bai further said that despite the  inability of the prosecution 
to proceed with their cases and prove their cases  beyond reasonable doubt, 
the accused persons he discharged are often re-arrested  by the police. This, 
Magistrate M’bai asserted, amounts to ‘challenging the  court and abusing the 
law.’ He said that the re-arrest is a result of the  prosecutor’s 
dissatisfaction of the said discharges.
Magistrate M’bai thus  urged the prosecutors to be willing to proceed with 
cases that are before his  court and be resolved to prove their cases beyond all 
reasonable  doubts.

2007 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION IN SENEGAL
Provisional  Election Results of The Senegalese 
Presidential Election
Baboucarr Ceesay  Dakar Correspondent
Provisional results of the presidential election for the  32 electoral 
districts of Senegal were released by the commission nationale de  recensement des 
votes   (National Commission for Census of Votes) on  Friday March 2nd, 2007 
with Abdoulaye Wade emerging as the victor in the first  round of voting with 
1,910,368 of the votes, equivalent to 55.86%. Idrissa Seck  polled 510,610 votes 
which is equal to 14.93%, Ousmane Tanor Dieng scored  463,967, that is 13.56% 
of the votes cast. The results further indicate that  Moustapha Niasse 
captured the fourth position with 202, 865 votes rated at  5.93%, Robert Sagna 
surprisingly led Abdoulaye Bathily and Landing Savané by  polling 88,390 of the 
votes cast representing  2.58%. 
However Abdoulie  Bathily obtained 75,759 votes, which is equivalent to 2.2%, 
while Landing Savane  polled 70,566 votes polling 2.06%, Talla Sylla got 
18,014 equivalent to 0.52%,  Sheik Bamba Dièye 17. 205 votes, 0.5%, Mame Adama 
Guèye 13,669, that stands at  0.39%, Mamadou Lamine Diallo 16,551 votes 0.4%, 
Doudou Ndoye 9.929 votes 0.29%,  El Hadji Alioune Mbaye alias Petit Mbaye got 
9050 votes, 0,26%, Louis Jacques  Senghor got 8,208 votes,  0.24%, and Modou Dia 
polled 4,488 votes  0.13%. 

Abdoulaye Wade’s Press Conference at the Palace
On  Idy, Tanor, Dansokho, Habib Thiam
Following the announcement of the  provisional results of the pressidential 
elections by the National Commission of  Census of Votes (commission nationale 
de recensement des votes) presided over by  Judge Sheik Tidiane Diakhaté, 
President Abdoulaye Wade held a press conference  at the Senegalese Presidential 
Palace in the evening of Thursday 1st February  2007. Wade used the news 
conference to announce the resumption of legal  proceedings against some key 
opposition politicians who served in his  government. 
Abdoulaye Wade, after having paid hommage to the Senegalese  people, 
announced the resumption of cases against those who have something to do  with the 
state funds, in particular Messers Amath Dansokho, Moustapha Niasse,  Ousmane 
Tanor Dieng, Habib Thiam and Idrissa Seck.
Wade went further to say  that the turnout reaching 70% is quite “
extraordinary”. He explained the new  system set up which requires a voter to combine the 
national identity card and  the voter registration card to be eligible to 
vote. He asserted that he is  pleased with the results. 
Wade expressed delight for the calm environment  during the election 
campaign. He said his campaign ended without incidents. The  only noted incident he 
said is the confrontation between the militants of  Idrissa Seck and the talibés 
of Sheik Béthio Thioune. 
As for the poll of  Sunday he said the electoral process occurred in peace. 
On his incomplete  projects, Wade said it now remains only with the 
International Airport Blaise  Diagne. He promised that the construction of this project 
will be launched on  April 4, 2007. 
Abdoulaye Wade considers the allegations of fraud of a  certain fringe of the 
opposition as simple fanfaronades to which we are  accustomed; that all the 
reports/ratios of the observers showed the  transparency. He said the system 
does not allow an error and the opposition was  present at all levels of the proc
ess. The man of Sopi call for a fight against  corruption for “serious charges
” on “alleged financial scandals”. He pointed out  that efforts are being 
made by his government to fight against corruption. “We  created a commission in 
which even the press has a seat and the opposition is  present at National 
Assembly. It is necessary for me to speak against the  corruption and stamp it 
out”, Wade stressed. He said he is not the one who  created the corruption. 
Abdoulaye Wade showed the conference a copy of Le  Quotidien (the Daily 
newspaper), which published in its Wednesday edition the  disappearance of a huge 
sum of money from the treasury. “A method out to smear  the image of our country
”, deplores Abdoulaye Wade. “This review of the World  Bank is simply meant 
to show how much the country received and how it was spent.  The survey is 
carried out in 25 countries comparatively. It is not money  deposited with the 
treasury and I am glad that the World Bank makes such an  investigation in 
Senegal”, explained Abdoulaye Wade. 
On what he referred to  as an erroneous accusation against his son Karim 
Wade, President Wade said his  son is not in any position that deals with money. 
Abdoulaye Wade specified that  the last two projects comprising the 
embellishment of the Western Cornice and  the widening of the Northern Road network 
financed by Kuwait at a cost of 19  billions CFA are underway. “This money is not 
given to my son, but is deposited  with the treasury that deals with the 
Kuwaiti company responsible for the work.  My son does nothing but supervise”, said 
Wade.  
He alleged that these  rumours come from the ex-Prime Minister Idrissa Seck 
with the conviction that he  wanted to put Karim Wade in his position. Wade 
said there is nothing worse than  calumny, affirming that he forgave all those 
who wronged him, even Idrissa Seck.  
Wade did not hesitate to add that he cannot forgive anyone for any wrong  
done to the state, and announced continuations of cases against those who owe  
the State. He said Idy, Tanor, Dansokho, Niasse and Habib Thiam who owe the  
state must pay it back to the state coffers. He said the audits were suspended  
so that he would not be witch hunting anyone or preventing any of his  
oppositions from going to the elections. He said there is no need for any witch  hunt 
because the files were there. He named Amath Dansokho, Moustapha Niasse,  
Ousmane Tanor Dieng, Habib Thiam and Idrissa Seck as those who should face  
charges as a result of having something to do with state funds. 
For Amath  Dansokho, Wade said he was involved in land sales belonging to the 
airport, when  he was Minister for Town Planning, and mismanagement as a 
mayor of Kédougou and  diversion of 17 million Cfa received within the framework 
of the decentralized  co-operation. As for Moustapha Niasse, President Wade 
said must answer 2  principal charges. Firstly, he said the purchase of his house 
on the Western  Cornice (Fann) for 11 million Cfa in 19 months. Secondly, the 
sale of passports  to Chinese people in Hongkong, when he was a Foreign 
Minister and should pay the  money to the treasury. 
As for Ousmane Tanor Dieng and Habib Thiam, Wade  alleged that they must 
answer charges relating to the sale of the fishing  licences valued at 20 billion 
Cfa. For Idrissa Seck, Me Abdoulaye Wade showed  the conference a paper 
bearing what he alleged to be the signature of the former  Prime Minister who made 
commitment when he was in prison to pay in installments  of 7 billion Cfa. 
According to Wade, Idrissa Seck knows that it is he who  managed the 
political funds. He said 40 billion or more is deposited in an  account in France; 
that there remains accounts in Luxembourg, Switzerland and  the United States for 
recovery of the ill gotten money deposited  there.
Calling for a majority in the Parliament, he again thanked the  Senegalese 
people. “You entrust me a responsibility, but my capacity will be  decreased if 
I do not have the majority in the National Assembly”, Said Wade.  
He said now the term of office for the President will be only two terms of  
five years. Delving into the issue of a successor, Wade said he or she would be 
 intelligent, hardworking with a good international relation, etc. He was 
quick  to add that it will not be Idrissa Seck. 
Some people expressed surprise that  a press conference which was considered 
to be an occasion to make reconciliation  with the opposition has been used by 
President Wade as a ground for settling  scores with his adversaries.

Dansokho And Niasse React To  Wade
Amath Dansokho in his reaction dismissed Wade’s accusation which were  made 
at the Presidential Palace on Thursday,. “Wade is a coward to say   that I 
Dansokho had sold plots of land in the zone of the airport and had a hand  on the 
sum of 17 million Franc Cfa of the town of Kédougou of which I was the  mayor’
, remarked Amath.  He said Wade is a sweet talker. He said that Wade  is fond 
of contradicting himself.
On his part, the candidate of the Coalition  Alternative 2007, Moustapha 
Niasse said he is convinced that there are flaws in  the election well before the 
day of the poll. The leader of the Alliance of the  forces of progress (Afp) 
did not want to comment on the scores because as he put  it, there are no 
matches because Abdoulaye Wade did not win the elections.  
At a press conference on Friday March 2nd, at the head office of his  
coalition, Moustapha Niasse dismissed the Chinese passports scandal and the  
acquisition of his house, in response to the attacks of Abdoulaye Wade. He said  the 
secretary general of the Senegalese Democratic Party (PDS) have programmed  
victory two years ago; that a politician and natives of Keur Madiabel,   Kaolack, 
mid-west of Senegal disclosed that people started voting from lists to  which 
they did not have access. 
By these mentioned practices he asked: “how  can one face a leader who makes 
invectives, which seeks to make one dirty? I  will not give him importance. I 
think of the young people whose votes were  diverted”, Said Niasse. Niasse 
added that 26 diplomatic passports were sold to  the Jonas Savimbi’s family. 
Moustapha Niasse disclosed that Senegalese  diplomatic passports were made 
available to the children of Jonas Savimbi, the  late rebel leader f of Angola. 
He concluded that there are confidential  documents supporting his claim.
On a malicious tone, he disclosed that the  operation occurred in an almost 
clandestine way. The former Prime Minister and  Foreign Minister of Senegal 
under the regime of Abdou Diouf, on the issue of the  Chinese passports, said 
this was governed by a decree which exists since  1996. 

IMPACT OF GUINEA’S CRISIS ON THE GAMBIAN   ECONOMY
By Isatou Bittaye
The crisis currently experienced by the people  of Guinea Conakry has a 
negative c effect on the economy of the Gambia with  regards to the commodities 
imported from there. Since the commencement of civil  unrest in Guinea Conakry, 
no export commodity has entered the Gambia from  Guinea. Foroyaa has contacted 
the Guinean businessmen who said the crisis has  negative effect on their 
business. One Yaya Touray, a businessman who imports  pineapple from Guinea 
indicated that the crisis has brought to their business in  pineapple at standstill. 
He added that since the crisis started in Guinea, they  could not import any 
pineapple into the Gambia. He said that the prices of the  commodities were 
very high before the crisis which in fact contributed to the  crisis. Touray 
highlighted that before the crisis, they were selling one kilo of  pineapple at 
D20 dalasis but since the crisis commenced, they decided to import  from Dakar 
which has increased the price to D35 dalasis per kilo; he concluded  that he 
is now engaged in apple business from Dakar, noting that the people need  
pineapple but that they cannot import pineapple from Guinea.
Also speaking to  this reporter, a Guinean Palm oil dealer, Abdoulie Sowe 
indicated that since the  crisis commenced, he has not imported any Palm oil from 
Guinea. He added that  his last importation was before the crisis. Mr. Sowe 
indicated that the crisis  has  a negative impact on their business because 
their business has stopped  at the moment. He however revealed that the crisis 
coincided with the shortage  of Palm oil in Guinea and that the prices were very 
high even before the crisis.  Mr. Sowe indicated that high prices have 
contributed to the crisis in Guinea  because they were fighting for the reduction of 
prices. He noted that currently  there is no uniform price because they heard 
that in some areas in Guinea,  prices are high while they are low in other 
areas. Mr. Sowe said that apart from  high prices they were not encountering any 
problems in their business before the  crisis. Other Guinean businessmen 
dealing in kolanuts and bitter cola also  expressed similar sentiments. 

FOCUS ON  POLITICS
INDEPENDENCE, THE TASK THAT LAY AHEAD
To start from our topic  “politics,” we must first of all understand what it 
means. Most of our  politicians at the time do not understand that politics 
is meant for the  individual life, that the aim of politics is to make the 
lives of individuals as  good as possible; that a politician is not to consider 
anything above the men,  women and children who constitute the populace under 
his/her jurisdiction or  even in the world beyond; that politics is to adjust 
our relations as human  beings in a way that each of us may have as much good in 
our lives as  possible.
According to Bertrand Russell, political institutions are to be  judged by 
the good or harm that they do to individuals. What economic system  should we 
adopt that would not concentrate initiative in the hands of a small  number of 
very rich men and leave the rest very little choice as to their  actions or 
activities, or leave them to play the role of  passive citizens  who would not 
have any initiative, despite their profession or trade. How do we  involve our 
people to participate in the political life of their country. Could  we have a 
democratic system which would allow divergence yet respect the  difference in 
opinion to accommodate the minority?
To quote Robert W. July,  President Jawara had presided unobtrusively over an 
improbable prosperity in  Gambia. Were our leaders aware of that and did they 
take cognizance of that  state? There were relevant questions at the time 
such as, could the African  regain control over his/her own ways of life and 
could he assert his  independence as a human being, as a black person in what was 
considered as the  white dominated world.
Economically, what road would Gambia take considering  the fact that the 
imperialists system gives little room to other backward  countries like ours to 
develop? And even where we accept to tail them and become  their neo-colonial 
regimes, do we have a way out? These are all questions which  must be thought of 
by our independence leaders. Did they ponder over the fact  that by the 1970s 
the country had very few high schools, only one tertiary  institution, The 
Gambia College teacher training institute and very few  graduates?
The population of The Gambia was small in size but abject poverty  that robs 
a person of conscience also abound, how could we eradicate human  being’s 
worse enemy, poverty?
The Gambia was mainly an agricultural country  and mainly depended on 
groundnut production for exports but the people also  depended on subsistence farming 
to grow just enough for themselves and their  families. How could this cycle 
be broken? Have our leaders pondered over this  reality?
The colonialists built only about 50 miles of tarred roads from  Banjul to 
Brikama. From Brikama to Basse has been described by some writers, at  the time, 
as the dustiest  road in West Africa. But the colonial regime  left behind a 
river boat the “Lady Wright” which ply between Banjul and Basse  carrying 
passengers and goods. Could that be sustained and developed to generate  revenue 
for the country etc? Cargo liners were also available to transport  groundnuts 
from the provinces to Banjul for onward export to Britain. Were we  prepared 
for independence psychologically now that we are free? Were we prepared  to be 
responsible solely for our affairs without looking up to big brother  England 
for every little national decision? 
We have started with a  democratic system of government and our objective was 
to establish a democratic  state that would accommodate each citizen to have 
not only a say but to  participate in the actual running of the country either 
directly or  indirectly.
The 1970 constitution emphasised that no one has a right to  govern this 
country without the concerns of the people. It also emphasised that  those who 
have our consent to govern this country are not our kings or masters  or monarchs 
but our servants. Did our leaders took heed to the fact that they  have a 
duty to serve us and we have a duty to scrutinize their service, and if  we are 
satisfied, we maintain them but if we are dissatisfied we remove them?  The 
democratic method is to remove them through the ballot or to replace them  
through the same vehicle, the ballot. Have our leaders accepted that method? If  
yes, have they created the right vehicle or level field and not the flawed one  
that would make it impossible for the people to remove them through that  
channel?
Have we worked hard enough to enlighten the people to know that in  politics, 
it is the Nation which is more important than the religion, or the  language 
or the tribe or the gender or our individual relations with one  another? Do 
we let every one know that each of us, irrespective of any other  
considerations, contribute to the national treasury which is eventually utilized  to 
provide the roads, hospitals, schools etc for all of us. Do we know exactly  why we 
select representatives to the National Assembly, councils etc, and why we  
select a president and the precise role of that president. These questions would  
be examined in detail to ascertain whether the PPP under Sir Dawda Jawara who 
 took the mantle of a democratic Republic in 1970 has performed to 
expectation or  not.

12 YEAR OLD GIRL NEEDS HELP
By Amie Sanneh 
A twelve  year old girl, Ann Marie, residing in Ebo Town, has difficulty in 
breathing  since early infancy. She has not really been well all this period. 
Ann Marie is  said to be suffering from chronic respiratory difficulty, easy 
fatigability,  recurrent chest infections, growth failure, occasional squatting 
and sudden  syncopal episodes. A medical report from the Director of Health 
Services  confirmed these complications. Young Ann Marie is said to have been 
admitted and  managed for these conditions at the Serrekunda Health Centre on 
several  occasions.
She was seen at the Paediatric Cardiology Clinic of the RVTH”  undernourished 
with facial puttiness, a grade III digital clubbing with no pedal  oedema or 
cyanosis. The percordium was hyperactive, the apex beat was displaced  to the 
6th left intercostal space, there was an increased area of cardiac  dullness 
and there was a grade IV/VI systolic murmur accompanied by a thrill at  the 
mitral area. The other systematic examinations were unremarkable” stated the  
medical report.
Given her deteriorating clinical condition, a medical board  has been 
convened to evaluate her current state of health. Today the Medical  board on Ann 
Marie has seen her undernourished, asthenic and shunted.
Her  weight is 15 kg, which is about 40 per cent of that expected for her 
age. Ann  Marie’s height is 120cm being much below the 3rd centile for her age. 
She is ill  looking, distressed and unhappy. She has a grade III digital 
clubbing, with a  puffy face, with no pedal or sacral oedema; she is not clinically 
pale or  cyanosed. The pulse rate of Ann Marie is 121 beats per minute, which 
is regular,  of a good volume and non-collapsing; there is no radio radial or 
radio-femoral  delay. The apex beat is at the 6th left intercostal space at 
the anterior  axillary line.
On the basis of the findings on Ann Marie’s overall  evaluation, it is likely 
that she has a congenital structural cardiac defect  including a mitral 
stenosis with possibly other associated cardiac  defects.
Given that extended facilities for further cardiovascular  evaluation, 
intervention paediatric cardiac reconstructive surgery are not  readily available 
within the sub-region.
Thus the medical board on Ann Marie  recommends that she should proceed 
overseas for a more extended evaluation such  as cardiac catherization, etc, rexue 
cardiac reconstructive surgery and other  more definitive management as soon 
as possible to prevent progression to  irreversible complications and sudden 
death.
Due to the expense and cost  involve in the treatment of young Ann Marie, the 
parents are calling on the  general public to come to their aid. Any 
individual or institutions who wish to  assist this young girl can contact Foroyaa.
 
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