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GAMBIA-L  July 2006, Week 3

GAMBIA-L July 2006, Week 3

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Fwd: Foroyaa Newspaper Burning Issue No.54/2006, 17-19 July, 2006

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Foroyaa Newspaper Burning Issue
Issue No.54/2006, 17-19 July, 2006
Editorial 
WHERE IS THE 120 MILLION DALASIS ALLOCATED TO THE IEC?
As the Supplementary Registration Exercise continues, the APRC militants have been stating at Registration Centres that President Jammeh has given money to the IEC to purchase materials to conduct registration. This false information is designed to provide them with a pretext to influence the registration exercise. The IEC needs to be very vigilant and should guard its impartiality and independence. Seven months ago the National Assembly approved a budget of 120 million dalasis for the IEC so that it can conduct all its operations without being dependent on anyone. The IEC should be demanding for its money.
We now ask the government: Where is the money which was supposed to be reserved for the use of IEC? 
Such money is designed to help the IEC to maintain its independence. The constitution has safeguarded the independence of the IEC. It did not expect the IEC Chairman to go to the President and ask for money.
The constitution wanted the IEC not to be influenced in any way by the President. This is why Section 44 of the Constitution states that “The Independent Electoral Commission shall submit its annual estimates of Expenditure to the President for presentation to the National Assembly in accordance with this constitution. The president shall cause the estimates to be placed before the National Assembly without amendment, but may attach to them his or her own comments and observations.”
It is therefore clear that the President does not have any power to approve or reject the budget of the IEC.
Foroyaa calls on the political parties in the country to assist the IEC to maintain its independence and impartiality. This is the only way we can have free and fair elections. Only free and fair elections can give rise to a genuine and popular government that can maintain peace and stability in the country. Anybody who encourages those who are not entitled to get voters cards are promoters of corrupt electoral practices. Such people should consider themselves as promoters of civil struggle and instability in our country.
It is amazing that some months ago the government was accusing compound owners and village heads of allowing strangers to stay in their villages and homes without scrutiny. It was claimed that this was a threat to the security of the country. Now, those same village heads and compound heads are helping every Tom, Dick and Harry to get ID cards and voters’ cards by issuing them with Attestation papers. History will eventually indict anyone who seeks to corrupt the electoral system to promote one’s selfish interest. 
 
MARCHEL BADJIE RELEASED
By Yaya Dampha
Mr. Marchel Badjie of St. Josephs Family Farm, who was arrested by the Police some time in April 2006 and detained at an unknown location for more than two months, has been released. Sources reaching this paper indicate that Mr. Badjie was released shortly before the African Union (AU) Summit which ended in Banjul a few weeks ago.
Mr. Badjie was arrested for allegedly transporting wounded rebel fighters from the Cassamance, a region in Southern Senegal. He was said to have been running a cross border project and people in Bwiam believe that Mr. Badjie’s project was solely a humanitarian one which had no connection what so ever with the fighting in that region. 
However, his move to bring alleged rebel fighters for treatment in The Gambia was not welcome by the security forces which led to his arrest and detention. 
When the news of Badjie’s release reached Foroyaa, an employee of St. Josephs Family Farm, in a telephone conversation with this reporter confirmed the release of his boss but said that Mr. Badjie himself was not present at the time of the phone call. The member of staff also informed this reporter that Mr. Badjie looked well but could not say where his boss was detained. Other sources have it that Marchel was detained at the Banjul Police Station. 
 
 
WHERE IS CHIEF MANNEH?
By Bubacarr K. Sowe
The family members of Chief Ebrima Manneh (a Staff reporter of the Daily Observer) are in a state of shock following the disappearance of their loved one.
According to the father, Sarjo Manneh, Chief has not returned home (in Lamin) since Friday, the 7th of July when he left for work in the morning.
“We last saw him on Saturday. He never travel without telling us where he is going. But this time we do not know where he is,” the father said. He also said that Chief’s mum has been trying to reach him on his mobile phone, but that did not materialise. “One of his colleagues came here recently telling us that Chief has not been reporting to work for days,” the father added.
His brothers complain that they have been to the National Intelligence Agency (NIA), the Serious Crimes Unit of the Gambia Police Force and various police stations in the Greater Banjul Area but failed to trace Chief Manneh.
One of the brothers who visited our office said he also visited Chief Manneh’s work place, The Daily Observer but he claimed that the reception of the Managing Director was hostile. He further claimed that the MD told him that the Daily Observer was not the place for him to look for Chief Manneh and asked him to go elsewhere in search of him.
 
 
RE: TOWARDS COMPROMISING THE INDEPENDENCE AND 
IMPARTIALITY OF THE IEC 
There are constitutional and unconstitutional means of changing governments. Africa has made its choice. No government will be accommodated that comes to power by unconstitutional means and no government will be tolerated that seeks to exist by unconstitutional means. This is the verdict of the 21st Century and it is irrevocable.
Mr. Chairman, a constitutional means of assuming control of government is not conceivable without a free and fair voting system. Independent Electoral Commissions are established to ensure that constitutional governments manifest the unalloyed choice of the people.
It can therefore be stated without any fear of exaggeration that your institution is the moral guarantor of peace, stability and constitutional order. Herein lies the weight on the head of the IEC Commissioners.
This is why you are given constitutional powers. Section 43 (3) of the Constitution states categorically that “In the exercise of its functions under the constitution or any other law, the Commission shall not be subjected to the direction or control of any other person or authority.”
It is abundantly clear that you as commissioners of the IEC should not be subjected to any direction or control by any other authority except the Constitution of the Republic.
This is why we were overwhelmed by your comments over radio and TV that you had to “consult the President who is the biggest stakeholder, the incumbent and his team of experts” without taking any initiative to consult the opposition parties at the highest level. It goes without saying that our agents were left in a state of limbo when registration stopped abruptly under the pretext that films were not available. Your subsequent announcement that you were considering an extension of the registration after your visit to the President, left our people in a state of suspicion. This is all the more so when the TV cameras were focused on people in Tallinding Kunjang who were protesting against your administration. Hardly do you find the state media focusing on the expression of mass disaffection. We are highly suspicious that such manifestations were orchestrated by the APRC stalwarts in collaboration with those who are in charge of GRTS, to intimidate your administration.
Mr. Chairman, before the commencement of the registration exercise we conveyed to you the need for planning in consultation with all stake holders to make your institution credible. We emphasised to you that some elements were masterminding a scheme of mass distribution of ID cards through connections initiated by party chairpersons. We have identified a compound in Tallinding Kunjang commonly referred to as Tamba Kunda where ID cards were being issued. We have spared no effort in informing you that some party operatives had established tables close to registration centres where they issued Attestations to claimants who went directly to get voters’ cards which they took back to them for documentation. Our agents had to protest vigorously against such parallel operations which gave the impression that the party operatives were in control of the whole registration exercise. The Attestation became the primary vehicle for those who are underage or are non Gambian citizens to get voters’ cards. Needless to say, many double registrations also occurred. It is therefore no surprise that you have already registered 94,000 voters in a supplementary registration of voters. If you were to review the Attestation forms you will discover, as we have already discovered, that some Alkalos (Village heads) simply append their signatures and give the forms to party operatives to photocopy and then fill in names as they meet people who are interested in getting voters’ cards by any means.
The exhaustion of your films and other electoral materials is connected with the scale of corrupt registration practice that has been employed.
In our view, the nature of the electoral malpractices cannot be handled by a revising court alone. We therefore intend to take three pronged approaches.
The first approach is administrative. The second and third approaches would be judicial.
Administratively, your commission has grossly erred in many fronts which is costing the opposition immensely. For example, you have created the impression that when the IEC became short of registration materials it is the president who stepped in to provide the required resources. The APRC stalwarts have been packaging and sending this view across the nation to give the impression that you are under the dictate of the president. Infact, long before you went to the president and the declaration of the extension party stalwarts had announced at some registration centres that you will be influenced to extend the registration. The announcement made by the brother of the Alkalo of Serrekunda is just one example.
Mr. Chairman you must make an administrative rebuttal of your comment that the president provides resources to the IEC. The IEC is required to be financially independent. Section 44 states that “The Independent Electoral Commission shall submit its annual estimates of Expenditure to the President for presentation to the National Assembly in accordance with this constitution. The President shall cause the estimates to be placed before the National Assembly without amendment, but may attach to them his or her own comments and observations.”  The IEC is financed by public funds from the tax money of the people and not from the private purse of an incumbent.
Seven months ago the National Assembly allocated 120 million dalasis to the IEC. This was supposed to be put under reserve. Where is this money? Why didn’t the IEC consult with the Inter Party Committee where all parties are represented to come up with a registration and electoral schedule.
With proper planning and consultation there can be no haphazard way of conducting registration. We want to know from the IEC what has happened to the 120 million. Has it been received? If not why did it proceed to fix dates for registration and elections without money. We therefore expect the IEC to address this issue. We also wish to propose the hiring of a consultant with the support of the international community to review all attestations to separate valid from invalid attestations. All those attestations that bear photocopied signatures should be weeded from the system.
Furthermore, signatures on attestations which tend to occur frequently on forms need to be scrutinized. We have witnessed young people with five ID cards on their tables which they rely on to fill attestation forms and put their own thumb prints. Such attestations need to be weeded from the system. 
It goes without saying that no one should be registered as a voter more than once. All double registrations should be weeded out of the system. This is the first action point.
Secondly, Section 22 of the Elections Decree empowers a person to file objections within 14 days after the publication of the list of voters. We are prepared to file objections.
However, the huge volume of the corrupt registration practice will be a burden to the Chief Justice who is to appoint magistrates to preside over the revising courts.
Needless to say, Section 24 of the Elections Decree does not state how long it should take for the revising courts to be constituted after the list is published. It is left to the dictates of what is practicable.
Suffice it to say, the revising court is given sixty days to decide commencing on the day the objections are lodged in the revising court.
Mr. Chairman, registration is going to end on 21st July, 2006. How long will it take to compile the list of voters and post them in the appropriate places; that may be by the end of July. Add 14 days scrutiny and filing of objections to the exercise and that will take us to middle of August. If two months are added to this we will be catapulted to the 15th of October before the exercise is legally required to be completed.
Mr. Chairman, how can elections be held on 22 September when the original dates for closing registration has shifted twice. We the stakeholders are just left to the whims and caprices of your commission. Since the members of your commission can be dismissed anytime by the executive we in the opposition are not seen as significant in your decision making process. We strongly urge you to engage in strategic planning with all stakeholders regarding the objections and the election date.
Finally, the enormous volume of people registered so far is enough to confirm our original fears. I once took the government to the African Commission for registering people in urban areas without street names and compound numbers. The government made a commitment to rectify the system. Nothing has been done in that regard. Furthermore, Section 17 of the Elections Decree states that “A person who claims to be entitled to be registered as a voter in a constituency shall, on presenting himself at a registration centre be supplied a registration form in such form as may be prescribed by the commission in conjunction with the appropriate department of state”.
 
Mr. Chairman, No form has been provided by your commission to anyone during the registration exercise. A process is flawed if what is mandatory is honoured with disregard.
 
In this respect, we will begin legal consultation to question the legality of the whole exercise.
Mr. Chairman, the constitution is quite clear on what is required. Section 214 (2) states that “The people shall express their will and consent as to who shall govern them and how they shall be governed, through regular, free and fair elections of their representatives.”
Section 26(b) asserts that “Every citizen of the Gambia of full age and capacity shall have the right, without unreasonable restrictions to vote and stand for elections at genuine periodic elections for public office, which elections shall be by universal and equal suffrage and be held by secret ballot.” We have a right to genuine elections. A corrupt registration system is an anathema to free and fair elections. 
 
All just and patriotic citizens should unite to correct the system.
 
Yours in the Service of The Nation
Halifa Sallah
For the NADD Executive
 
…………………..
cc The Press
All) Political Parties
African Commission On Human And People’s Rights
African Centre For Democracy And Human Rights Studies
 
 
PA SALLAH JENG’S CASE CONTINUES
The former Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Banjul City Council (BCC), Mr. Abdul Fatah Oyhman, has testified in the ongoing trial involving the suspended mayor of BCC Mr. Pa Sallah Jeng.
The suspended mayor is facing six counts of criminal charges. He was alleged to have inter alia, illegally or dishonestly received perdiem payments at the rate of £130.00 (one hundred and thirty pounds) per day, over and above the official allowance of £100.00 (one hundred pounds) per day and, thereby caused financial loss to BCC; and in breach of Section 45 of The Gambia Public Procurement Act and Section 12 of The Gambia Public Procurement Regulations, intentionally single sourced and directed the purchase of a second-hand towing ambulance for a sum of D340,000 to the detriment of The Gambia.
Jeng is also facing the charge of “intentional act or omission” detrimental to the economy of The Gambia, contrary to section 5(f) of the Economic Crimes Decree. According to the particulars of offence, Pa Sallah Jeng, as mayor of Banjul City Council, between the months of September and November 2003, “intentionally single sourced and directed the purchase of three compactors for the sum of D1, 500,000.00 (one million five hundred thousand dalasis) in violation of Section 45 of The Gambia Public Procurement Act and section 12 of The Gambia Public Procurement Regulations, to the detriment of the economy of The Gambia.
Testifying before Hon. Justice S. Monageng of the High Court in Banjul, on Thursday, July 13, the ex-CEO said he had worked for the council from 1984 to 2004, but he is presently unemployed. Further responding to questions from the Acting Deputy Director of Public Prosecution, Mrs. Marie Saine-Firdaus Othman, said BCC was created by an Act of parliament and has two arms; the policy making body and the executing body- the latter headed by the CEO.
He told the court that as CEO, his duties included the day to day running of the council; responsible for all the staff, incoming and outgoing correspondents. “I was also responsible for executing policies of the council, writing correspondences for the council and, I was also the Accounting Officer,” he added.
Asked by Saine-Firdaus as to what procedures should followed in respect of procurements, the witness said initially they prepared a budget estimate which is approved by council, and that when approved, it is sent to the SoS for Local Government and Lands for approval. He said when approved at that level, then the executing arm of council could spend as per the set down rules and regulations. Othman also informed the court that the executive arm of the council has two signatories: The CEO and the Director of Finance, both of whom must sign before payment could be done.
“And lately, we are also governed by the GPPA Act,” he stated. He said that during his time, the council had procured three compactors (specialised vehicles for garbage collection) and a towing vehicle. Asked what procedure was used in the procurement of the three compactors, Othman said Jeng had informed him that he (Jeng) has procured three second hand compactors, because of the garbage situation at the time. He told the court that the council was renting private vehicles at a rate of D1000 per day, because they had no reliable truck for collecting garbage. He said when Jeng told him about the procurement of a truck, he asked him to relate it to the council. But according to Othman, Jeng had already procured them. He said when it was taken to the council, it was approved for payment. But he added, “I minuted to the mayor that we are covered by The Gambia Public Procurement Act and, according to the Act, before any procurement above D1,000,000.00 (one million dalasis) is made we should inform and seek permission form the GPPA, failing which we shall be violating the Act.” Othman said he then wrote a letter to the GPPA seeking their permission and craving their indulgence to waive the procedure and give approval, hence the mayor had already procured them. But he said they had waited for GPPA’s reply, but they did not get any. “Each costs D500,000, so the three compactors were D1.5m. The mayor was pressurising me to start paying the seller. I told him that I was waiting for a response from the GPPA,” he recalled. He added that Jeng had replied to him, justifying why he had bought the compactors. And he said, Jeng insisted for the payment. “When he persisted, being my boss, I did not want him to think I was refusing his instructions. So, I told him ‘If I have a written directive from you, even though I have not had the approval from GPPA, I will carryout your instruction’,” the court was told. According to him, it was at that point that Jeng scribbled on the file, “Mr. Othman, I give you the directive.” He said he then paid the first installment, still with the hope that GPPA will reply so that they continue with the rest of the payments. He could not, however, remember how much was paid, but he said the correspondents between him and the mayor in respect of this must be in council’s files. When a bunch of documents relating to the compactors were shown to him; he recognised them, but he said the minute he sent to Jeng informing him of the GPPA Act was missing from the bunch. At that juncture the case was adjourned to Monday, 17 July. Lawyer, Lamin Camara and Mrs. Neneh Cham-Chongan appeared for Mr. Jeng.
 
 
SULAYMAN MAKALO ON THE RUN
Information reaching this paper have it that the Deputy Editor in Chief of the Independent Newspaper has gone into hiding for fear of being arrested. 
According to the report, Makalo went into hiding after he received information that state security agents are resolved to arrest him. The report went further to say that the informant has warned Makalo to leave the country.
Makalo was also informed that his colleagues at the Daily Express (a newly registered paper) are currently in the custody of the security agents. Makalo was supposed to be the Editor in chief of the Daily Express, but he had to turn down the offer after his family pressurised him to relinquish the position.
Two journalists have already left this country in the past three months for fear of their lives. 
 
 
TREASON TRIA L 
PART (2)
By Surakata Danso 
When the case was called, one of the defence lawyers Borry s. Touray informed the court that one of the defence lawyers, Lamin Camara (Counsel for Bunja Darboe) has with drawn from the case. The trial Judge however maintained that the case would proceed until counsel Camara addressing the court on his withdrawal. The court went to dismiss the objection raised by Borry Touray on the evidence of Capt Seckan, which Touray said is a hearsay evidence following his citation of section 19A, the Judge indicated that since the getting DPP had indicated that the witness is narrating facts which occurred between him and the first accused, he up held that the evidence is there fore in line with section 19B of the evidence act. At this stage Borry rose up and reminded the court that their motion dated 4th July 2006 is to be heard and that he intends to move it. The Judge asked whether the case was adjourned for the hearing of the motion, Counsel Touray answered in the affirmative, the Judge went through his records and the records confirmed Touray’s stated but he however told the court that he will first hear the testimony of Captain Seckan, and later in the day, he will hear the motion Counsel Touray rose up to inform the court that, the motion is meant to stay proceedings on the trial. He however submitted that on that note, it is proper to hear the motion first, but Justice Agim told the counsel that he cannot come to his court and dictate what the court should do. Mr. Touray again rose to say that it is not about dictating but what is proper procedure he was ignored by the court, the witness was called and asked to testify.
Captain Seckan continued to say that Captain Bunja Darboe had told him that the former Chief of Defence Staff, Colonel Ndure Cham, had informed him (Bunja) that he (Ndure Cham) had informed him (Captain Seckan) of the operation. This again provoked lawyer Borry Touray to raise an objection. He said the evidence is a more serious hearsay on second hand. He cited section 19D of the evidence act and submitted that the evidence is not admissible. He further mentioned that even the last ruling 19B cannot address the issue of second hand hearsay evidence. He further went on to say that the evidence is meant to establish the bases of the trial by using the word operation. This he said implies coup. Mr. Touray then called on the court to expunge that evidence from the records.
In his reply, the Acting DPP indicated that the evidence is an assertion of what had transpired between the witness and the first accused. The Judge asked the acting DPP why it is not hearsay. Mr. Fagbenleh replied that the fact that the statement was made is a testimony that the evidence has got a capacity on the case. He urged the court to dismiss the objection and allow the witness to continue. He said the defence is at liberty to test the evidence during cross examination, on lead an evidence on it if they so wish. Mr. Touray in his reply on points of law indicated that looking at section 19A in line with section 19D, hearsay evidence are not admissible on the issue of the defence to address it during cross examination or to lead evidence. Mr. Touray told the court that why should evidence which is not admissible, taken just to be contested. He indicated that the first accused can not be a credible witness to the trial, and that the former Chief of Defence Staff is at large, and that fact is known by the court.
In his ruling, the Judge dismissed the objection by relying on section 19B of the evidence Act. He indicated that the Acting DPP had indicated that the evidence is not meant to establish the fact, but to show what has transpired between the first accused and the witness. He said the defence had failed to show how it is hearsay.
Captain Seckan further indicated that he had told Captain Darboe that Ndure Cham had never told him any thing on the issue. He said Bunja expressed surprise. He told Bunja that his office is just by the office of the Ndure Cham. He said he asked Darboe to find out from Ndure Cham. He indicated that he asked Bunja when they intend to implement the operation. He said Bunja replied that they intend to carry out the operation when the President is out of the country.
Mr. Touray rose to his feet and objected to the evidence on the grounds that the use of the word operation is implying a coup. He therefore urged the court to dismiss the evidence. The acting DPP in his reply cited section 19A of the evidence act and mentioned that the evidence is meant to show what the witness and the first accused (Bunja) had discussed. The court dismissed the objection on the grounds that the usage of the word is only meant to give an account of what happened between the two.
Continuing his testimony, Seckan informed the court that Bunja had told him that they intend to do their operation on Monday when the President is away. Captain Seckan said he asked Bunja “at what time?” the witness said Bunja had said at 2am. He said he asked who and who were involved. He said Bunja said “we are many” Captain Seckan said that he insisted to know the people involve in a bid to avoid him knowing whom target and whom not to. He said it was then that Bunja gave him the following names from their various barracks. Army headquarters him/self (Bunja Darboe), Abdourahman Jam, and Momodou A. Bah; Fajara barracks himself (Captain Saikou Secka), Alpha Bah and Momodou Lamin Bah. He said when Bunja told him that he would be responsible of Fajara barracks. He said he asked Bunja why he was informed late. He said before Bunja replied him, he him Captain Seckan had told him that he is not interested in the whole thing. He said he further asked Bunja about the people who will be responsible for Yundum barracks he said Wassa Camara. He said Bunja had told him that Yaya Darboe will be responsible for Farrafenne Barracks. He said when he asked Bunja who will be responsible for the State guards he said Bunja said he is not sure of their men. On the assignment of the groups, he said Bunja had told him that Cpt Alpha Bah and Captain Manlafi Corr would be responsible for Mounting Check points and arresting. He said Bunja had told him that the operation would be led by Ndure Cham. Captain Seckan said that he had told Bunja at that stage that all of them are prepared to die that following day. He said Bunja replied that we are all officers. He said he had told Bunja that he can help him to die but not to have his money. He said Bunja asked him “which money?” That he indicated to Bunja our United Nation’s Staff officer’s allocation fund.
Captain Seckan said he then told Bunja that they were discussing a very serious thing at a place which is not save. He said he advised Bunja that they should move from his office to his (Captain Seckan’s) office. He said then Captain Dem and him left for his office and they were later followed by Bunja Darboe. He said Bunja then asked him whether he was serious about his money business. He said he told Bunja that if he does not trust what he said let him go to Captain Baldeh who is in charge of finance. He said when Bunja asked Captain Baldeh about the fund it was confirmed to him that he (Captain Seckan) was not paid. He said before Bunja left for his office he had promise him that he would get back to him. Captain Seckan said he told Captain Dem that since they do not know the extent of the army’s involvement, it was good to deal with the NIA. He said he questioned Dem if he has a friend at the NIA. He said Dem said in the affirmative but he tried his NIA friend but he could not get him on line. He said it was then that he called his NIA friend and made arrangements with him. He said after they asked him if he was aware of what was going on. He said the NIA friend replied in the negative. He said he told the NIA friend that the army was engaged in a plot to over throw the government of President Jammeh on that day at 2am. He said he told his NIA friend to inform his Director but could not get him. He said he then asked the NIA friend to contact the Presidential delegation in Mauritania which he said he did.
Captain Seckan said that on Tuesday he had asked Captain Dem if Bunja had got back to him as planned at 15.00 hours he said Dem told him “not at all.” He said on contacting Bunja on telephone Bunja told him that he had gone to Lamen very lately and that was why he could not make it. He said Bunja apologised and promised the same 15:00 hours that day. Captain Seckan said it was at then that he told Captain Bunja Darboe that he was not interested in the whole thing. He said while he was in his office, he received a file containing the change of a Sergeant at the State guard. He said he asked for the CDS. But was informed that Ndure Cham was out. He said he then called him on his mobile and told him of the charges of the Sergeant. He said the CDS Ndure Cham then gave him time the following day to bring the Sergeant before him. He said after taking the Sergeant to him (Ndure Cham) he said 
Cham asked him whether he had been informed of anything by Bunja Darboe Captain Seckan said he informed the CDS of his discussions with Bunja. He said the Chief of Defence Staff then informed him that they were ready to go a head as planned. He said the CDS informed him that Lang Tombong Tamba and Buba Badjie will be arrested. He said the CDS advised him to laise with Captain MA Bah. At this stage, the proceeding was stood down. And on resumption the trial could not proceed dune to the poor health condition of counsel Touray. Borry Touray did inform the court of the complaints advanced by the accused persons. (1) They are brought to court with out taking breakfast, that their normal time of taking breakfast is 12 noon.
(2) That they are being kept in cells for the whole day except when they have visitors. Mr. Touray submitted that as it stands at the moment, the accused persons are not convicts, but remained prisoners. He said as such, they are entitled to regular charge of clothing’s, visitors, and to receive food from their families three times daily. Lawyer Touray asserted that this is a Prison Warden, Sunkany Jallow appeared before the court to say that he is the fourth in command at the security wing. He had denied all that was raised on behalf of the detainees by the lawyer Borry Touray. The court asked him to inform Mr. Ceesay in charge of the security wing to appear before the court the following adjourn date. 
 
 
GPU GETS PRINTING MACHINE
By Amie Sanneh
The American Embassy in Banjul has donated a printing machine worth twenty three thousand dollars to The Gambia Press Union.
In presenting the printing machine, to the GPU at the US Embassy’s warehouse in Kanifing on Thursday, the American Ambassador Joseph Stafford said his embassy will do all it can to ensure a free and vibrant media in The Gambia.
He said the promotion of human rights is a priority to the United States, and the media has an important role to play in the promotion of human rights.
He noted that the government and the media have an important role to play in the promotion of human rights.
He expressed optimism that the printing press will serve a useful contribution to the GPU, and it will help the union to operate smoothly.
The American Ambassador assured the union of his unflinching support at all times.
He said he also has plans to facilitate exchange visits between media practitioners in the US and The Gambia.
In his speech, the President of the GPU, Madi Ceesay, revealed that the printing machine will be of great significance to the GPU, noting that media houses in the country are beleaguered by the lack of a printing machine. He said this has frustrated some media houses, and has compelled them to print on A4 size papers.
The printing press, the GPU President maintained, win reduce the constraints confronting the media houses. 
He emphasised that the media is part of a democratic system which cannot exist without a vibrant press. He continued to say that there cannot be a vibrant press in the absence of a printing machine.
Mr. Ceesay however called on media practitioners to be objective in a bid to avoid bias reporting. 



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December 2017, Week 1
November 2017, Week 5
November 2017, Week 4
November 2017, Week 3
November 2017, Week 2
November 2017, Week 1
October 2017, Week 5
October 2017, Week 3
October 2017, Week 2
October 2017, Week 1
August 2017, Week 3
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August 2017, Week 1
July 2017, Week 3
July 2017, Week 1
June 2017, Week 3
June 2017, Week 1
May 2017, Week 4
May 2017, Week 3
May 2017, Week 1
April 2017, Week 5
April 2017, Week 4
April 2017, Week 3
April 2017, Week 1
March 2017, Week 5
March 2017, Week 3
March 2017, Week 2
March 2017, Week 1
February 2017, Week 4
February 2017, Week 3
February 2017, Week 2
February 2017, Week 1
January 2017, Week 4
January 2017, Week 3
January 2017, Week 2
January 2017, Week 1
December 2016, Week 5
December 2016, Week 4
December 2016, Week 3
December 2016, Week 2
December 2016, Week 1
November 2016, Week 5
November 2016, Week 4
November 2016, Week 3
November 2016, Week 2
November 2016, Week 1
October 2016, Week 4
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July 2016, Week 4
July 2016, Week 3
July 2016, Week 2
July 2016, Week 1
June 2016, Week 5
June 2016, Week 4
June 2016, Week 3
May 2016, Week 3
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May 2016, Week 1
April 2016, Week 5
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January 2016, Week 1
December 2015, Week 5
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December 2015, Week 3
December 2015, Week 1
November 2015, Week 5
November 2015, Week 1
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October 2015, Week 4
October 2015, Week 3
October 2015, Week 2
September 2015, Week 5
September 2015, Week 4
September 2015, Week 3
September 2015, Week 1
August 2015, Week 1
July 2015, Week 4
July 2015, Week 3
July 2015, Week 2
July 2015, Week 1
June 2015, Week 4
June 2015, Week 3
June 2015, Week 2
June 2015, Week 1
May 2015, Week 4
May 2015, Week 3
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May 2015, Week 1
April 2015, Week 5
April 2015, Week 4
April 2015, Week 2
April 2015, Week 1
March 2015, Week 4
March 2015, Week 3
March 2015, Week 2
March 2015, Week 1
February 2015, Week 4
February 2015, Week 3
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February 2015, Week 1
January 2015, Week 4
January 2015, Week 3
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January 2015, Week 1
December 2014, Week 5
December 2014, Week 4
December 2014, Week 3
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November 2014, Week 5
November 2014, Week 4
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February 2014, Week 4
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February 2014, Week 1
January 2014, Week 5
January 2014, Week 4
January 2014, Week 3
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January 2014, Week 1
December 2013, Week 5
December 2013, Week 4
December 2013, Week 3
December 2013, Week 2
December 2013, Week 1
November 2013, Week 5
November 2013, Week 4
November 2013, Week 3
November 2013, Week 2
November 2013, Week 1
October 2013, Week 5
October 2013, Week 4
October 2013, Week 3
October 2013, Week 2
October 2013, Week 1
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July 2013, Week 5
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January 2013, Week 1
December 2012, Week 5
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February 2012, Week 1
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January 2012, Week 1
December 2011, Week 5
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November 2011, Week 4
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October 2011, Week 4
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June 2011, Week 5
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June 2011, Week 1
May 2011, Week 5
May 2011, Week 4
May 2011, Week 3
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May 2011, Week 1
April 2011, Week 5
April 2011, Week 4
April 2011, Week 3
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April 2011, Week 1
March 2011, Week 5
March 2011, Week 4
March 2011, Week 3
March 2011, Week 2
March 2011, Week 1
February 2011, Week 4
February 2011, Week 3
February 2011, Week 2
February 2011, Week 1
January 2011, Week 5
January 2011, Week 4
January 2011, Week 3
January 2011, Week 2
January 2011, Week 1
December 2010, Week 5
December 2010, Week 4
December 2010, Week 3
December 2010, Week 2
December 2010, Week 1
November 2010, Week 5
November 2010, Week 4
November 2010, Week 3
November 2010, Week 2
November 2010, Week 1
October 2010, Week 5
October 2010, Week 4
October 2010, Week 3
October 2010, Week 2
October 2010, Week 1
September 2010, Week 5
September 2010, Week 4
September 2010, Week 3
September 2010, Week 2
September 2010, Week 1
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August 2010, Week 4
August 2010, Week 3
August 2010, Week 2
August 2010, Week 1
July 2010, Week 5
July 2010, Week 4
July 2010, Week 3
July 2010, Week 2
July 2010, Week 1
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June 2010, Week 2
June 2010, Week 1
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May 2010, Week 4
May 2010, Week 3
May 2010, Week 2
May 2010, Week 1
April 2010, Week 5
April 2010, Week 4
April 2010, Week 3
April 2010, Week 2
April 2010, Week 1
March 2010, Week 5
March 2010, Week 4
March 2010, Week 3
March 2010, Week 2
March 2010, Week 1
February 2010, Week 4
February 2010, Week 3
February 2010, Week 2
February 2010, Week 1
January 2010, Week 5
January 2010, Week 4
January 2010, Week 3
January 2010, Week 2
January 2010, Week 1
December 2009, Week 5
December 2009, Week 4
December 2009, Week 3
December 2009, Week 2
December 2009, Week 1
November 2009, Week 5
November 2009, Week 4
November 2009, Week 3
November 2009, Week 2
November 2009, Week 1
October 2009, Week 5
October 2009, Week 4
October 2009, Week 3
October 2009, Week 2
October 2009, Week 1
September 2009, Week 5
September 2009, Week 4
September 2009, Week 3
September 2009, Week 2
September 2009, Week 1
August 2009, Week 5
August 2009, Week 4
August 2009, Week 3
August 2009, Week 2
August 2009, Week 1
July 2009, Week 5
July 2009, Week 4
July 2009, Week 3
July 2009, Week 2
July 2009, Week 1
June 2009, Week 5
June 2009, Week 4
June 2009, Week 3
June 2009, Week 2
June 2009, Week 1
May 2009, Week 5
May 2009, Week 4
May 2009, Week 3
May 2009, Week 2
May 2009, Week 1
April 2009, Week 5
April 2009, Week 4
April 2009, Week 3
April 2009, Week 2
April 2009, Week 1
March 2009, Week 5
March 2009, Week 4
March 2009, Week 3
March 2009, Week 2
March 2009, Week 1
February 2009, Week 4
February 2009, Week 3
February 2009, Week 2
February 2009, Week 1
January 2009, Week 5
January 2009, Week 4
January 2009, Week 3
January 2009, Week 2
January 2009, Week 1
December 2008, Week 5
December 2008, Week 4
December 2008, Week 3
December 2008, Week 2
December 2008, Week 1
November 2008, Week 5
November 2008, Week 4
November 2008, Week 3
November 2008, Week 2
November 2008, Week 1
October 2008, Week 5
October 2008, Week 4
October 2008, Week 3
October 2008, Week 2
October 2008, Week 1
September 2008, Week 5
September 2008, Week 4
September 2008, Week 3
September 2008, Week 2
September 2008, Week 1
August 2008, Week 5
August 2008, Week 4
August 2008, Week 3
August 2008, Week 2
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July 2008, Week 5
July 2008, Week 4
July 2008, Week 3
July 2008, Week 2
July 2008, Week 1
June 2008, Week 5
June 2008, Week 4
June 2008, Week 3
June 2008, Week 2
June 2008, Week 1
May 2008, Week 5
May 2008, Week 4
May 2008, Week 3
May 2008, Week 2
May 2008, Week 1
April 2008, Week 5
April 2008, Week 4
April 2008, Week 3
April 2008, Week 2
April 2008, Week 1
March 2008, Week 5
March 2008, Week 4
March 2008, Week 3
March 2008, Week 2
March 2008, Week 1
February 2008, Week 5
February 2008, Week 4
February 2008, Week 3
February 2008, Week 2
February 2008, Week 1
January 2008, Week 5
January 2008, Week 4
January 2008, Week 3
January 2008, Week 2
January 2008, Week 1
December 2007, Week 5
December 2007, Week 4
December 2007, Week 3
December 2007, Week 2
December 2007, Week 1
November 2007, Week 5
November 2007, Week 4
November 2007, Week 3
November 2007, Week 2
November 2007, Week 1
October 2007, Week 5
October 2007, Week 4
October 2007, Week 3
October 2007, Week 2
October 2007, Week 1
September 2007, Week 5
September 2007, Week 4
September 2007, Week 3
September 2007, Week 2
September 2007, Week 1
August 2007, Week 5
August 2007, Week 4
August 2007, Week 3
August 2007, Week 2
August 2007, Week 1
July 2007, Week 5
July 2007, Week 4
July 2007, Week 3
July 2007, Week 2
July 2007, Week 1
June 2007, Week 5
June 2007, Week 4
June 2007, Week 3
June 2007, Week 2
June 2007, Week 1
May 2007, Week 5
May 2007, Week 4
May 2007, Week 3
May 2007, Week 2
May 2007, Week 1
April 2007, Week 5
April 2007, Week 4
April 2007, Week 3
April 2007, Week 2
April 2007, Week 1
March 2007, Week 5
March 2007, Week 4
March 2007, Week 3
March 2007, Week 2
March 2007, Week 1
February 2007, Week 4
February 2007, Week 3
February 2007, Week 2
February 2007, Week 1
January 2007, Week 5
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January 2007, Week 3
January 2007, Week 2
January 2007, Week 1
December 2006, Week 5
December 2006, Week 4
December 2006, Week 3
December 2006, Week 2
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November 2006, Week 5
November 2006, Week 4
November 2006, Week 3
November 2006, Week 2
November 2006, Week 1
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